Blackbutt, Western Australian

Western Australian blackbutt is a large Australian hardwood from the forest areas of south west Western Australia. It is used for general construction, flooring and paneling.

Other Names

WA Blackbutt, Yarri, Swan River Blackbutt

Botanical Name

Eucalyptus patens

Common Form
Sawn
Species Type

Western Australian blackbutt is a large Australian hardwood that grows in the wetter southwest jarrah and karri forest areas of Western Australia. It is generally in very limited supply, in part to it growing in reserves.

Also known as yarri, it is lighter in appearance than blackbutt, Eucalyptus pilularis. The heartwood is a pale yellowish brown, while the sapwood is much paler in appearance.

Western Australian blackbutt has a medium to course texture and an interlocked grain, which can make this species harder to work. Apart from this it has good workability characteristics. Pinholes may also be present but can sanded or polished out during finishing.

Western Australian blackbutt is used for general construction applications, flooring and joinery.

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

10.00%

Radial :

5.00%

Unit Movement Tangential:

Unit Movement Radial:

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F14

F11

F8

F7

F5

Seasoned:

F17

F14

F11

F8

F7

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

850kg/m3

Unseasoned:

1100kg/m3

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

66

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

99

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

12

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

13

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

37

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

65

Impact - Unseasoned:

13

Impact - Seasoned:

11

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Toughness - Seasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Hardness - Unseasoned:

5.5

Hardness - Seasoned:

6.9

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Susceptible

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Termite Resistance:

Resistant

Fire Properties

1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Average Specific Extinction Area:

<250

Bushfire Resistance:

BAL 12.5 and 19 – All AS3959 required applications
Appearance

Western Australian blackbutt is lighter in appearance than blackbutt, Eucalyptus pilularis. The heartwood is a pale yellowish brown, while the sapwood is much paler in appearance. 

It has a medium to course texture and an interlocked grain, whereas other blackbutt varieties tend to have a straight grain.

Common Applications

Western Australian blackbutt is mainly used in flooring.

Workability

Western Australian blackbutt has a medium to course texture and an interlocked grain, which can make this species harder to work. Apart from this it has good workability characteristics. Pinholes may also be present but can sanded or polished out during finishing.

Origin of timber
WA
Western Australian blackbutt is in quite limited supply and generally only available in Western Australia.
Source of timber
Native Forest
Image

Flooring

The warmth, strength and natural beauty of timber flooring is enduringly popular in a wide variety of domestic, commercial and industrial applications.

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