Taun

Taun comprises several hardwood species occurring in various parts of South-East Asia and the Pacific. Taun lends itself to general building construction and decorative uses.

Other Names

Malugai (Philippines), Kasai, Sibu (Sarawak, Sabah), Truong (Vietnam), Aia Fai, Mala, Ula, Ako Dawa (Solomon Islands), Tava (Western Samoa), Ahabu, Matoa (Papua New Guinea), Malugay, Akwa, Pometia Tomentose, Pometia Tomentosa, Pometia spp.

Botanical Name

Pometia Pinnata

Common Form
Sawn
Species Type

Taun comprises several members of the Pometia species occurring in low-lying coastal and riverine areas of Sri Lanka and South-East Asia, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Samoa. Although the species can attain heights of up to 25 metres, an irregular bole and elliptical cross-section results in relatively short log lengths.

Taun heartwood varies in colour from pink to reddish-brown, darkening with age. Sapwood is a pale, pinkish buff, not always visually distinct from the true wood. The grain of taun timber is straight, with occasional interlocking, and of moderately coarse texture.    

Taun is a moderately durable hardwood, with an above ground life expectancy of between 15 and 40 years. Its in-ground life expectancy is considerably shorter, at between five and 15 years. Taun sapwood is susceptible to lyctid borer attack and is very difficult to impregnate with preservative. Taun is not termite-resistant.

Uses of taun in construction include general house framing, cladding, fascia boards, internal flooring, and plywood. Taun's properties also lend themselves to decorative applications such as lining, paneling, joinery, cabinetwork, outdoor furniture, carving, turnery and veneers. It is also used for boat building and cooperage.

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

6.80%

Radial :

3.80%

Unit Movement Tangential:

0.27%

Unit Movement Radial:

0.19%

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F14

F11

F8

F7

F5

Seasoned:

F22

F17

F14

F11

F8

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

700kg/m3

Unseasoned:

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

66

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

103

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

12

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

15

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

33

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

58

Impact - Unseasoned:

Impact - Seasoned:

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Low - up to 15 Nm

Toughness - Seasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Hardness - Unseasoned:

4.3

Hardness - Seasoned:

6.7

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Susceptible

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Termite Resistance:

Not Resistant

Fire Properties

1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Group Number - Other:

3 if used on MDF or particleboard ≥12mm; veneer thickness 0.6-0.85mm

Average Specific Extinction Area:

<250

Bushfire Resistance:

BAL 12.5 and 19 – Door and window joinery only
Appearance

Taun heartwood varies in colour from pink to red-brown, darkening with age. Sapwood is a pale, pinkish buff, and not always visually distinct from the true wood. The grain of this timber is straight, occasionally interlocked and of moderately coarse texture.  

Common Applications

Uses of taun in construction include general house framing, cladding, fascia boards, internal flooring, and plywood. Taun's properties lend themselves to decorative applications such as lining, paneling, joinery, cabinetwork, outdoor furniture, carving, turnery and veneers. It is also used for boat building and cooperage.

Workability

Taun is moderately hard (rated 3 on a 6-class scale) in relation to indentation and ease of working with hand tools. The timber saws and turns easily with only a moderate blunting effect on cutting edges. It is readily bored and holds nails and screws well, can be satisfactorily bonded using standard gluing procedures, takes paints and stains well, and can be polished to a smooth, high finish. While taun is reasonably easy to work, sanding dust may be an irritant to mucous membranes.

Origin of timber
Asia
SE Asia, New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, Sabah, Samoa, Sri Lanka, Andaman Islands, Tonga, Niue
Readily Available
NSW
Small quantities of taun are imported into Australia.
Source of timber
Plantation
Image

Portal Frames

For buildings that require large spans and column free interiors, timber portal frames provide one of the most aesthetically pleasing solutions. Utilising modern engineering technology, portal frame design transforms timber into a highly effective, efficient and economical structural product.

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