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Marri

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Marri is a distinctive bloodwood native to Western Australia. It is an adaptable tree that grows in both jarrah and karri forests in the state's southwest, from north of Geraldton to Cape Riche and inland beyond Narrogin, and can also be found on the Swan Coastal Plain and Darling Scarp.

Marri is often called red gum due to the gummy red protrusions often seen on its trunk. As the name suggests, the timber is high in gum, resulting in low recovery rates of first grade timber. In the past, few timber millers produced it, however marri's feature grain has become more popular in recent times for making fine, handcrafted furniture.

The dark red gum of the marri tree contrasts beautifully with the yellow to pale brown heartwood, while the 40mm wide sapwood is noticeably paler and often tending to white. Marri has a rather coarse but even texture with slightly interlocked grain. Gum veins are common and logs are generally sound to the centre.

Marri timber is increasingly used for modern household furniture. The finished honey-coloured timber with a distinctive vein structure makes handsome flooring. It can also be used for general construction, handles, oars and sporting equipment, while preservative-treated material is useful for piles, poles and posts.

 

Appearance

Marri's yellow to pale brown heartwood and paler to white sapwood contrast beautifully with the dark red gum that features on the tree's trunk. It has a coarse but even texture with slightly interlocked grain. The finished timber is honey-coloured with a distinctive vein structure.

Common Applications

Marri is popularly used for household and fine furniture and makes attractive flooring. It can also be used for general construction, handles, oars and sporting equipment, while preservative treated marri is useful for piles, poles and posts.

Common Form

Sawn

Workability

Marri takes readily to preservative impregnation.

Origin of Timber

WA

Readily Available

WA

Availability - Further Information

Marri has limited availability throughout Australia although it is becoming more popular due to its application for furniture making and flooring.

Availability - Further Information

Native Forest

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

6.60%

Radial:

3.70%

Unit Movement Tangential:

0.34%

Unit Movement Radial:

0.22%

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F17

F14

F11

F8

F7

Seasoned:

F27

F22

F17

F14

F11

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

855kg/m3

Unseasoned:

1200kg/m3

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

78

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

125

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

14

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

17

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

41

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

66

Impact - Unseasoned:

20

Impact - Seasoned:

23

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Toughness - Seasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Hardness - Unseasoned:

6.6

Hardness - Seasoned:

7.1

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Susceptible

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Termite Resistance:

Not Resistant

Fire Properties

1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Average Specific Extinction Area:

<250

Bushfire Resistance:

BAL 12.5 and 19 – All AS3959 required applications

Flooring

Whether for structural or finished flooring applications, timber offers durability, versatility and adaptability. The warmth, strength and natural beauty of timber flooring has proved enduringly popular in a wide variety of interior settings.

Timber flooring is a timeless product, offering a warmth and natural beauty largely unmatched by other flooring options. This article provides an overview of the installation of solid timber strip flooring over bearers and joists, timber based sheet flooring products and concrete slabs. Timber flooring is typically supplied as either solid timber or laminated wood products, made from layers of bonded timber. It fits together with a tongue and groove joint and once in place, is sanded and finished. There is a wide variety of species to select flooring from and the right species for a given application will be dependent on numerous factors. Information relating to species selection, environmental assessment, finish selection and recommended maintenance routines are all provided in this section.

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