Mahogany, Philippine Light Red

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Philippine light red mahogany is a tropical hardwood typically found in Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. Part of the extensive Shorea species that includes over 180 species, it is a popular export timber and widely used as a slightly cheaper alternative to teak. The light red of the species is the most common and is sought after as a finishing timber throughout Australia.

The heartwood of light red mahogany is a pale straw colour when first cut, with a characteristic oily odour. It turns to a pale pink to mid red brown hue as it dries. The sapwood is up to 50mm wide and usually yellow, pink, or grey and sometimes not easily distinguished. The timber's texture is coarse but even, with an interlocked grain that often produces a stripe or ribbon figure on the radial surface. Logs may contain brittleheart. Narrow concentric lines of resin ducts may be mistaken for growth rings and pinhole borer discolouration and pencil streak is more common than in dark red mahogany.

The timber is relatively easy to dry but bluestain can be a problem unless precautions are taken. It mostly finishes well, although tools must be kept sharp to avoid producing a woolly surface. This feature can often be overcome with sanding. Light red mahogany nails and glues well but beware of localised tearing when cross cutting and pre-drilling. It is unsuitable for steam bending.

Philippine light red mahogany is often used for plywood, internal moulding, joinery and paneling. It is popular for domestic finishing applications such as skirting boards, architraves and door jambs.

Appearance

The heartwood of light red mahogany is a pale straw colour when first cut, with a characteristic oily odour.  It turns to a pale pink to mid red brown hue as it dries. The sapwood is up to 50mm wide and usually yellow, pink, or grey and easily distinguished. The timber's texture is coarse but even, with an interlocked grain that often produces a stripe or ribbon figure on the radial surface. Narrow concentric lines of resin ducts may be mistaken for growth rings and pinhole borer discolouration and pencil streak is more common than in dark red mahogany.

Common Applications

Philippine light red mahogany is often used for plywood, internal moulding, joinery and paneling.  It is popular for domestic finishing applications such as skirting boards, architraves and door jambs.

Common Form

Sawn

Workability

The timber is relatively easy to dry but bluestain can be a problem unless precautions are taken. It mostly finishes well, although tools must be kept sharp to avoid producing a woolly surface. This feature can often be overcome with sanding. Light red mahogany nails and glues well but beware of localised tearing when cross cutting and pre-drilling. It is unsuitable for steam bending.

Origin of Timber

Asia

Readily Available

NSW

Availability - Further Information

Philippine light red mahogany is widely marketed and used in Australia as a finishing timber and is readily available in all states. It is commonly known as Pacific maple in this country but can also be traded as Maple, Lauan, Meranti and Seraya.

Availability - Further Information

Native Forest

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

4.20%

Radial:

1.60%

Unit Movement Tangential:

0.30%

Unit Movement Radial:

0.14%

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F8

F7

F5

F4

Seasoned:

F11

F8

F7

F5

F4

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

550kg/m3

Unseasoned:

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

46

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

66

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

7.2

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

8.5

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

23

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

41

Impact - Unseasoned:

Impact - Seasoned:

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Toughness - Seasoned:

Hardness - Unseasoned:

2

Hardness - Seasoned:

2

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Susceptible

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Termite Resistance:

Not Resistant

Fire Properties

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

EFH Spread-of-Flame Index:

EFH Smoke-Developed Index:

1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Group Number - Other:

3 if used on MDF or particleboard ≥12mm; veneer thickness 0.6-0.85mm

Average Specific Extinction Area:

<250

Bushfire Resistance:

Not Tested

Panelling, Interior

Internal panelling, also known as appearance boards and linings, is not just a practical means of covering one or more walls and ceilings in a building, its inclusion in a room's interior design can generate looks that are both dramatic and stylish. Internal paneling comes as either solid natural timber paneling or as sheets of engineered wood products that provide a durable and hardwearing surface for areas subject to high impact. As they typically function as appearance products they generally have no structural requirements. This guide describes the variety of panelling products available and outlines the straightforward process of installing them.

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