Stringybark, Yellow

Yellow stringybark is a hardwood timber species found along the south coast of New South Wales. It is used for flooring, decking, heavy construction and structural applications.

Other Names

Yellow Stringy

Botanical Name

Eucalyptus muelleriana

Common Form
Sawn
Species Type

Yellow stringybark is a medium to large hardwood species that grows in southern New South Wales and eastern Victoria. The tree features yellow to yellowish-brown heartwood with distinctively paler sapwood. Its grain is medium to fine, mainly straight but sometimes interlocked. Gum veins and bug holes are common.

Historically, commercial applications of yellow stringybark have ranged from wood chips to heavy construction in the form of piles, poles, bearers and stumps. Its timber is now widely used for flooring, decking and furniture. Excellent results have been obtained for outdoor structures such as pergolas, steps and hand railings. When appropriately kiln-dried, yellow stringybark may be used as a structural timber.

Untreated yellow stringybark is equivalent to ‘fire retardant treated timber’ when tested in accordance with AS/NZS 3837. The bushfire rating of this timber is expected to remain unchanged if assessed in accordance with proposed changes to the standard.

 

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

7.50%

Radial :

4.30%

Unit Movement Tangential:

0.37%

Unit Movement Radial:

0.27%

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F17

F14

F11

F8

F7

Seasoned:

F27

F22

F17

F14

F11

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

885kg/m3

Unseasoned:

1150kg/m3

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

86

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

132

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

14

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

17

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

45

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

76

Impact - Unseasoned:

17

Impact - Seasoned:

15

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Toughness - Seasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Hardness - Unseasoned:

6.7

Hardness - Seasoned:

8.6

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Not Susceptible

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Termite Resistance:

Resistant

Fire Properties

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

EFH Spread-of-Flame Index:

EFH Smoke-Developed Index:

Critical Radiance Flux - Lower:

>2.2 and <4.5

Smoke Development Rate:

<750
1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Group Number - Other:

>2.2 and <4.5

Average Specific Extinction Area:

<250

Bushfire Resistance:

BAL 12.5 and 19 – All AS3959 required applications
Appearance

Yellow stringybark features a yellow to yellowish brown heartwood, with paler sapwood. Its grain is medium to fine, and is mainly straight but sometimes interlocked. Gum veins and bug holes are common.

 

Common Applications

Yellow stringybark was once mainly used for heavy construction (piles, poles, bearers, stumps) and wood chips. It is now commonly used for flooring, decking and furniture. Excellent results have been obtained with the use of this timber for outdoor structures such as pergolas, steps and hand railings. When appropriately kiln-dried, yellow stringybark may be used as a structural timber.

 

Workability

This native hardwood machines and sands well to produce excellent flooring. It is unsuitable for steam bending. Pre-drilling is recommended for nailing and screwing. Yellow stringybark readily accepts most standard coatings and stains, and excellent results may be obtained with oil-based finishes. Given the timber’s natural density, polyurethane glues are recommended for bonding. 

 

Origin of timber
NSW
Readily Available
NSW
Yellow stringybark is also available in Victoria.
Source of timber
Native Forest
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Fencing

When it comes to fencing, timber is a natural choice. A material that is durable, strong and reliable it compliments almost every outdoor landscape and environment. Clear specification, detailed installation and appropriate maintenance will ensure a timber fence provides a natural and lasting property boundary and back drop for years to come.
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Pergolas

A timber pergola is a practical, functional and attractive way to extend living and entertainment spaces into the outdoors.
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Rails and Balustrades, Exterior

This provides general information on member sizes, connections and suitable materials for construction of handrails and balustrades in external applications. Commonly built from treated softwood and durable hardwoods, they can be finished with a wide variety of paints or stains, creating balustrades that with the right care and attention, will comfortably withstand the elements for decades to come.
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Structural Timber Poles

Timber poles are utilised in structural construction to provide support for gravity loads and resistance against lateral forces. Not only serving a structural function, timber poles provide many aesthetic benefits, with their use in construction often complementing architectural designs aimed at harmonisation with the natural environment.
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Flooring

The warmth, strength and natural beauty of timber flooring is enduringly popular in a wide variety of domestic, commercial and industrial applications.

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