Oak, Tasmanian

Tasmanian oak is a premium Australian hardwood timber encompassing three species that grow in the mountainous areas of Tasmania. It is a versatile timber perfect for both construction and interior applications, including flooring, panelling, architraves and skirting boards.

Other Names

Mountain ash, alpine ash, gum-topped stringybark, Australian oak, whitetop stringybark, white-top, woollybutt, blue leaf, mountain white gum.

Botanical Name

E. delegatensis, E. obliqua & E. regnans

Common Form
Sawn
Species Type

Tasmanian oak is the name used for three almost identical species of eucalypt hardwoods that are normally marketed collectively. E. delegatensis (alpine ash) occurs at higher altitudes, while E. regnans (mountain ash) is found in wetter sites; E. obliqua (messmate) has a wide distribution, occurring in wet forests but also extending into drier areas.

Warm, dense and resilient, Tasmanian oak is the preferred hardwood for a wide range of applications. It works extremely well and produces an excellent finish. It can be used in all forms of construction and in interior applications such as panelling and flooring. It can be glue-laminated to cover long spans. Veneers, plywood and engineered products are also available. It is also a popular furniture timber, and its fibre is sought after for reconstituted board and production of high quality paper.

Tasmanian oak is light in colour, varying from straw to reddish brown with intermediate shades of cream to pink. It is recognised for its excellent staining qualities, which allow ready matching with other timbers, finishes or furnishings.

Tasmanian oak is marketed under different names depending on where it is being sold. In Victoria and NSW; it is also sometimes mistakenly referred to as Victorian ash. It should be noted however that, unlike Victorian ash, Tasmania oak also includes messmate. Consequently, Tasmanian oak has a wider and less consistent colour mix. Importantly, it should also be noted that unlike Victorian ash, Tasmanian oak is susceptible to lyctid borer.

 

Shrinkage

Very Low Low Medium High Very High

Tangential :

13.30%

Radial :

6.60%

Unit Movement Tangential:

0.36%

Unit Movement Radial:

0.23%

Strength Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium High

Medium

Reasonably Low

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

S1

S2

S3

S4

S5

S6

S7

S8

Seasoned:

SD1

SD2

SD3

SD4

SD5

SD6

SD7

SD8

Stress Grade

Structural
No. 1
Structural
No. 2
Structural
No. 3
Structural
No. 4
Structural
No. 5

Unseasoned:

F14

F11

F8

F7

F5

Seasoned:

F22

F17

F14

F11

F8

Density per Standard

Seasoned:

650kg/m3

Unseasoned:

1050kg/m3

Joint Group

Very High

High

Reasonably High

Medium

Low

Very Low

Unseasoned:

J1

J2

J3

J4

J5

J6

Seasoned:

JD1

JD2

JD3

JD4

JD5

JD6

Colour

  White, yellow, pale straw to light brown Pink to pink brown Light to dark red Brown, chocolate, mottled or streaky
   

Mechanical Properties

Modulus of Rupture - Unseasoned:

63

Modulus of Rupture - Seasoned:

110

Modulus of Elasticity - Unseasoned:

13

Modulus of Elasticity - Seasoned:

17

Maximum Crushing Strength - Unseasoned:

30

Maximum Crushing Strength - Seasoned:

63

Impact - Unseasoned:

14

Impact - Seasoned:

21

Toughness - Unseasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Toughness - Seasoned:

Medium - 15 - 24 Nm

Hardness - Unseasoned:

3.4

Hardness - Seasoned:

4.9

Durability

Low Moderate Reasonably High High
(0 - 5 yrs) (5 - 15 yrs) (15 - 25 yrs) (more than 25 yrs)

In-Ground:

(0 - 7 yrs) (7 - 15 yrs) (15 - 40 yrs) (More than 40 yrs)

Above ground:

(0 - 20 yrs, usually < 5) (21 - 40 yrs) (41 - 64 yrs) (More than 60 yrs)

Marine Borer Resistance:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility:

Lyctid Borer Susceptibility - Other:

Sapwood is generally susceptible. Tasmanian Oak is usually sold free of sapwood.

Termite Resistance:

Resistant

Fire Properties

Critical Radiance Flux - Lower:

>2.2 and <4.5

Critical Radiance Flux - Higher:

>2.2 and <4.5

Smoke Development Rate:

<750
1 - non-combustible 2 - reasonably non-combustible 3 - slightly combustible 4 - combustible

Fire Properties Group
Number:

Average Specific Extinction Area:

>250

Bushfire Resistance:

Not tested
Appearance

Tasmanian oak is light in colour, varying from straw to reddish brown with intermediate shades of cream to pink. It is recognised for its excellent staining qualities, which allow ready matching with other timbers, finishes or furnishings.

Common Applications

Tasmanian oak can be used for protected structural applications, such as timber framing, but it is best suited to indoor applications and furniture due its low to moderate durability. Flooring, paneling and high-end joinery are some of its more common applications, although it is also used for agricultural implements, oars, cooperage, boxes, crates, paper pulp and in the manufacture of plywood.

Workability

A strong and stable timber, Tasmanian oak offers good all round workability. It planes, sands, finishes and glues well, and will readily steam and bend. This makes Tasmanian oak is ideal for internal applications and furniture.

Origin of timber
TAS
Readily Available
National
Source of timber
Native Forest
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Joinery

Timber joinery offers a classic, stylish touch to any interior or exterior space.
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Panelling, Interior

Timber panelling creates interiors as warm as they are stylish. Commonly using an MDF or plywood substrate, internal timber paneling is natural and versatile and comes as either solid natural timber panels or as sheets of engineered wood products
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Mouldings

Mouldings are extremely versatile and durable, enhancing the aesthetics of any interior and functioning as the icing on the cake for designs with a focus on beauty and splendour.
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Rails and Balustrades, Interior

With its natural beauty and inherent strength, timber is a popular material choice for internal balustrades. Commonly built from treated softwoods and durable hardwoods, interior balustrades and handrails are typically finished with a clear lacquer to generate the most natural result.
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Stairs, Interior

Timber is the material of choice for designers seeking internal staircases of strength, beauty and durability.
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Flooring

The warmth, strength and natural beauty of timber flooring is enduringly popular in a wide variety of domestic, commercial and industrial applications.

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